5 Things Office 365

Does it Do…

Office 365 (O365) does almost everything, but this may depend on your plan. Many versions of O365 come with OneDrive, Teams, and OneNote. Yet Firms pay for subscriptions to Dropbox or Slack or Evernote. If your plan does not have the feature you want, then consider upgrading. It’s usually cheaper than buying another product and keeps everything within one integrated suite. However, some solutions, like SharePoint or Flow (workflow app) will require customization to see their full benefits.

Work Wherever. Use the Web Apps!

Get used to the web apps. Saving items to OneDrive, or editing in Word online makes life easy. No need to worry about where to save and they keep you mobile while moving you to paperless. Also, word online saves automatically. Co-authoring is also easier online but can be done locally.

I Solemnly Swear, it’s Secure.

Do not worry about security. All of Office 365 will meet all your firm’s compliance needs. Internally you can lock or block access to documents or items. Externally, as an admin, you can limit or control sharing and mobile device management. Plus, they have a portal that will let you download the information.

Collaboration. You’re Doing It Wrong.

O365 has Groups, Teams, Yammer (think of it as Facebook for your firm) and SharePoint team sites. All are good and facilitate collaboration. Use them! Don’t get lost worrying about which is best for you. There are articles and YouTube videos that can answer these questions. If you’re a small firm, pick one and get started. If it turns out it’s not right, try another. Being small you are nimble and can change direction.

Don’t Buy Technology. Invest!

Microsoft has spent millions, if not billions, of dollars and hours on O365. If you don’t like something it’s likely that you don’t fully understand the workflow or the design of the tool. In learning O365 I encountered this “gotcha” often. For example, I was trying to create complex SharePoint searches and apps to recreate a DMS. However, Delve in O365 brings documents from anywhere in O365 to you in one place. You can create document tags, see what others are working on (assuming you have permission to access that document), search for documents, favorite, and discover documents that you may interest you.

Putting it All Together

In conclusion, O365 does a lot. Make it a point to, at least vaguely know, what it does and includes. Then before you buy additional software you, you may learn that your O365 subscription already has what you need. Then learn how to use it.

Leave a Comment